Dyad is NOT a rhythm game (and more helpful advice!)

Watching someone play Dyad makes absolutely no sense at all.

The PSN exclusive, which is planned for release this summer, has been created by Shawn McGrath. We spoke to Shawn about a month ago, but even after that in-depth look at the game's creation, we're not totally sure that people understand just what is going on in Dyad. So now we're back with Shawn to give you a dummy's guide to the magic of Dyad in video form.

Watching someone play Dyad makes absolutely no sense at all.

The PSN exclusive, which is planned for release this summer, has been created by Shawn McGrath. We spoke to Shawn about a month ago, but even after that in-depth look at the game's creation, we're not totally sure that people understand just what is going on in Dyad. So now we're back with Shawn to give you a dummy's guide to the magic of Dyad in video form.

Some important things to remember while watching this video:

1) It's not a rhythm game!

While music plays a big role in Dyad, it has no impact on the gameplay whatsoever. Think of it like Rez, which was made infinitely cooler by its totally reactive soundtrack. Same deal here.

2) Pairs are important.

The crux of Dyad is about zapping pairs of the same color. Zap two oranges in a row or two blues in a row and you'll zoom ahead, earning points and speed.

3) Close, but not too close.

Zapping colors in later levels grants you the ability to sap some energy from them as you zoom past. Just don't run square into them or you'll get sent backwards. Gather enough energy and you'll be able to use your special attack, called the Lance, which makes you invulnerable for a short time, akin to a charging rhino.

4) It's not for stoners.

Despite the trippy visuals of Dyad, it's a game that requires intense concentration and accuracy, especially in later levels. If you're just looking to trip out, stick with staring at a YES album cover. Dyad is more the sort of game you play after six cups of coffee.

5) Have an audience.

There are plenty of games that don't work well with a crowd. Dyad is not one of them. Onlookers will have no idea what you're doing on screen, but they'll definitely be mesmerized, and it makes for great party music, assuming you're not terrible.


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