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Rockstar 'threatened to sue the shit' out of a TV series called 'LA Noir,' says Frank Darabont (update: Take-Two denies it threatened suit)

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Director and writer Frank Darabont was in the process of developing a television show titled L.A. Noir when he was forced to change its name as Rockstar "threatened to sue the shit out of me," he told io9.

The television series, which shares a similar name with Rockstar's 2011 release L.A. Noire, is set in Los Angeles during 1947 — the same setting and time period of the video game. The series, however, is based on a novel by the same name.

"Yes, it was going to be called L.A. Noir, based on the book by John Buntin," said Darabont. "But the video game company with the video game called L.A. Noire (with an e!) threatened to sue the shit out of me, TNT, every company that actually ever worked in Hollywood. And they have the billions of dollars to back it up, apparently. So we're changing the title, and I do believe the title is going to be Lost Angels. This is being announced right here. It's a very, very cool show. It's [set in] 1947 L.A. and it stars my very dear friend Jon Bernthal, whom I worked with on The Walking Dead who is now free of that..."

Polygon has contacted Rockstar for further comment and will update when we hear back.

Update: Rockstar Games' parent company, Take-Two, denied ever threatening to sue Darabont or anybody else in a statement the company provided to Polygon.

"Take-Two never contacted Mr. Darabont nor threatened to sue any party," said a Take-Two spokesperson. "The facts are that Take-Two reached out to [Turner Broadcasting System, parent company of TNT] to express concern over confusion between the properties and they responded that they had decided to change the title of the show independent of Take-Two's concerns."

Take-Two also expressed annoyance with Darabont for making claims about a purported lawsuit. "It's unfortunate that Mr. Darabont finds it necessary to gain publicity by making inaccurate statements," the company said.