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Activist plans to air drop The Interview into North Korea, general tasked with stopping it

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The ongoing culture war in Korea rages on.

South Korean activist Park Sang-hak says he plans to use helium-filled balloons to carpet bomb North Korea with DVD and USB copies of The Interview starting as early as this month, according to ABC News.

South Korean newspaper Chosun Ilbo reports that a three-star general in North Korea has been tasked with stopping the latest battle in the culture war. The general is assisted by a dozen or so officials who have launched a taskforce. Senior security officials, police officers, border guards, and a squadron in charge of cracking down on foreign media content have been told to block the smuggling of the film.

"The regime has started cracking down on the black market, while keeping close watch on smugglers in the border area," the source told the newspaper. "Officials are visiting homes and checking computers and DVD players."

Sony Pictures canceled the theatrical release of The Interview on Dec. 17 after a month long release of hacked information about the company and amid threats of a terrorist attack on theaters that showed the film. President Obama later said the decision disappointed him. On Dec. 23 Sony Pictures announced that the film would have a limited release on Christmas Day.

The FBI has said that North Korea was behind both the hack attack on Sony and the threats connected to the movie. North Korean officials have denied that.

Park, a North Korean defector, said his balloon lift for the movies will be done in conjunction with the U.S.-based non-profit Human Rights Foundation. The group is paying for Korean subtitles for the movie.

The copies will be brought to South Korea around Jan. 20, according to ABC, and shortly thereafter the group will try to float the first wave of balloons into North Korea.

The group and Park have long used giant balloons to carry propaganda into North Korea.

To read more on how a movie is part of what some call a culture war, check out my column on movies, video games and the alleged "soft war" against America's enemies.