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A closer look at Scuf’s Xbox One Elite controller mods

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New paddles and a directional bias d-pad

Scuff modded Xbox One Elite controller
Brian Crecente

Earlier this month, Scuf unveiled its first line of mods for the official Xbox One Elite controller.

The custom controller company announced two different kits for the controller: the Scuf Elite Paddle Control System and Directional Bias D-pad kit, which it’s now selling for about $40, and a $30 Scuf Elite Pro Grips and Precision Thumbstick Kit, which they say is coming soon.

The company sent us one of the $40 kits a week or so ago, along with Scuf’s own take on the Elite controller, which you can check out over in this post.

Scuf paddles
Brian Crecente

The paddle control system and directional pad that come with the kit are fairly easy to swap in and out with your existing Elite controller equipment.

Unlike the paddles that come with the Elite controller, which are four separate paddles which can be placed horizontally on the controller, the Scuf paddles are all permanently mounted vertically onto a replacement battery cover.

The result is really a matter of personal taste; I like the horizontal layout that comes with the Xbox Elite controller, but others might be a bigger fan of the vertical setup. That said, both setups feel equally solid.

Directional bias d-pad on the right
Brian Crecente

As much as I can see a use for the different sort of paddles that come with the Scuf mod kit, I really can’t figure out what someone would want with the bias directional pad. Like the directional pads the Xbox Elite comes with, the bias d-pad uses magnets to just pop on to the controller. It’s essentially a round pad that sweeps up in one section that can be aligned to one of four main directions.

Like the paddles, the quality remains the same for the directional pad as what you find with the included Elite pads.

I’ve included a gallery of the bits and pieces below.