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Here’s how the new PlayStation 4 Pro stacks up against Xbox’s Project Scorpio

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So many flops

At today’s PlayStation Meeting in New York City, Sony finally unveiled the hardware we all knew was coming: the PlayStation 4 Pro. Originally revealed in reporting from Kotaku in March of this year, the upgraded console’s hardware capabilities were later suggested by a report on Giant Bomb. This report indicated that the PlayStation 4 Pro, codenamed "Neo," would be approximately 2.25 times more powerful than the original PS4 model, pegging it at around 4.2 teraflops of computing power.

However, Sony’s early numbers were soundly leapfrogged by Microsoft with the announcement of Project Scorpio at this year’s E3. Microsoft told attendees at its press briefing that Scorpio would be "the most powerful console ever" with computational power measured at 6 teraflops. The question became how Sony would react.

At its press conference today, Sony demurred on discussions of the PS4 Pro’s hardware specs, but the company later issued a press release confirming earlier reports that the system will run at 4.2 teraflops. This corroborates Polygon’s earlier reporting that Project Scorpio will be, on paper, approximately 43 percent more powerful than the PS4 Pro.

It’s worth noting that this could change. First, Microsoft could conceivably reduce the power of Scorpio, though this seems unlikely, given that the company has put its shoulder into the "6 teraflops" marketing hook. Second, Sony could increase clock speeds in the PlayStation 4 Pro, which both Microsoft and Sony did before the launches of the Xbox One and PS4 in 2013.

But as importantly, there’s more we don’t know about the Xbox Scorpio. For example, we don’t know how much RAM it will have, despite knowing its dramatically increased memory bandwidth. That amount could make a major difference if it’s more than the existing Xbox One’s 8 GB of DDR3 RAM.

But that kind of information notwithstanding, the numbers seem clear: Microsoft’s Project Scorpio will be much more powerful than the PlayStation 4 Pro — assuming you can wait another year for it.