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J.J. Abrams is making a Spider-Man comic with new villain Cadaverous

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The Star Wars director will co-write a Marvel limited series with his son

Promotional cover for Spider-Man #1 by J.J. Abrams, Henry Abrams, and Sara Pichelli/Marvel Comics (2019). Olivier Coipel/Marvel Comics

After a four-day countdown that many fans interpreted quite differently, Marvel Comics has revealed what was behind all those webs: a J.J. Abrams-penned Spider-Man miniseries.

Abrams, director of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, Super 8, and Star Trek, will co-write the book with his son, Henry. The series, the two announced in a video, will be drawn by Miles Morales co-creator Sara Pichelli, and will simply be called Spider-Man.

According to New York Times interview announcing the series, Marvel editor Nick Lowe reached out to the elder Abrams as early as 10 years ago, but it wasn’t until recently — while talking with Henry — that Abrams really dug into the idea of writing Spider-Man.

“A year or so ago,” the elder Abrams said, “I started talking about it with Henry and it sort of happened organically. And that has been the joy of this. Even though I’ve been talking to Nick for a long time, weirdly, this feels like it just sort of evolved from the conversations of Henry and I, having ideas that got us excited and Nick being open to the collaboration.”

Little is known about the plot of the series yet — the released cover art for it indicates that Mary Jane will appear, and the Abramses said that the story will feature a new villain named Cadaverous. The younger Abrams told the New York Times that the book was developed from “a new and different and exciting take on Spider-Man.”

Prior to today’s reveal, many fans were expecting a graphic novel adaptation of Sam Raimi’s scrapped Spider-Man 4 script. Check out the full cover for Spider-Man below:

Promotional cover for Spider-Man #1 by J.J. Abrams, Henry Abrams, and Sara Pichelli/Marvel Comics (2019). Olivier Coipel/Marvel Comics