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Twitch stops creepy site from rounding up ‘cute girls’

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Bunnyhop TV goes against broadcasters’ wishes

A grid of women streamers featured on Bunny Hop TV Image: Bunny Hop

Being a woman on Twitch can already be rough, and a website called Bunny Hop doesn’t seem to be making things easier. The site, which seems fairly new, exists exclusively to highlight “cute girls” — Bunny Hop’s words — who are live on Amazon’s broadcasting service. And based on a number of responses on social media, it appears that most people on it never gave Bunny Hop the OK to be on the site.

“They absolutely do NOT have my permission to do this,” one Twitch streamer wrote on Twitter.

“This is not ok, why am I even on the website,” another said.

“You should have to get notified and agree to stuff like this,” another streamer featured on the site opined.

Update: Twitch has blocked Bunny Hop from embedding livestreams, according to a Twitter post by a support account. While streams are still visible when you visit the Bunny Hop homepage, clicking through to engage with them further now results in an error.

Polygon reached out to Bunny Hop to inquire how it chooses which entertainers to feature on the site, along with a message to Twitch, but did not receive a response in time for press. Bunny Hop describes itself as “The best place to watch girls playing video games, just chatting, ASMR, and more,” on its Twitter profile.

Twitch recently announced changes to its Hateful Conduct and Harassment guidelines, which explicitly prohibit “inciting malicious raids of another person’s social media profiles off Twitch.” Twitch also has rules against sexual harassment, which it defines as “unwelcome sexual advances and solicitations, sexual objectification, or degrading attacks relating to a person’s perceived sexual practices.”

A website like Bunny Hop could equip onlookers to target women based on their appearance and could encourage users to engage in the type of sexual harassment prohibited in Twitch’s revised guidelines. Some streamers highlighted on the website claim that they’ve noticed an uptick in random users who come into their chat with unwanted sexual comments, which they’re attributing to Bunny Hop. Twitch’s regulations stipulate that violators may see Twitch “take action against persons for hateful conduct or harassment that occurs off Twitch services that is directed at Twitch users.”

A number of women featured on the site say they are currently attempting to report it to Twitch, but as of this writing the site is still up and running, albeit slowly. A social media post by Bunny Hop asks users for feedback on the site, and the top response to it is currently threatening legal action.