clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

3 years after its release, Hidden Folks is getting new levels (and mouth sounds)

New, 3 comments

The game price is going up, too

A music level with lots of hand-drawn details in Hidden Folks Image: Adriaan de Jongh

Developer Adriaan de Jongh announced Tuesday that his hand-drawn hidden object game, Hidden Folks, will get six new levels on June 4. The new update, called On Tour, will add six music-themed areas to the game, “with more than 70 things to find, new mouth sounds, and plenty of new clues with mildly amusing or straight up bad jokes,” de Jongh wrote in a post on Steam.

Hidden Folks was released in 2017 for iOS, Android, and PC. In 2018, it came to the Nintendo Switch. (Nintendo Switch players will have to wait for the On Tour update, though. De Jongh said players there will have to “wait a bit longer, as Nintendo is swamped.”)

The team’s been releasing new content on occasion, including new mouth sounds and a beach-themed pack. This month, all the DLC content — except mouth sounds — will be rolled into the base game; players won’t have to buy any additional content. But the game price will be increased slightly to adjust for that.

(Wonder what’s up with the mouth sounds? For those who haven’t played, Hidden Folks is voiced entirely by humans — but they’re not talking. Instead, they’re making sounds, like a zzzzziiiip when a tent is opened or making the different beep noises of a car.)

“Today or tomorrow, depending on when Valve accepts our price change request, the game’s pricing will on average (because currencies are weird) increase by 50-60%,” de Jongh wrote on Tuesday.

On June 4, all players that have purchased the game — whether at the original price or newly increased price — will receive the On Tour content.

Screenshots of the new music-themed areas show the same sort of charming art style from the base game. There’s a recording studio, a disco floor, large concert venues, and festival vibes. But personally, I can’t wait to hear those new mouth sounds.


Vox Media has affiliate partnerships. These do not influence editorial content, though Vox Media may earn commissions for products purchased via affiliate links. For more information, see our ethics policy.