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Animal Crossing fans are building all sorts of secret rooms

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Hidden in plain sight

An Animal Crossing villager shows off their house. Image: Nintendo EPD/Nintendo via Twitter/Andrew Barnick

When it comes to decor, many Animal Crossing: New Horizons homes include the basics: a bedroom, a kitchen, a living room, that sort of thing. But some players are going a little further and finding ways to inject intrigue into their set-ups.

All houses are structured the same, once you’ve fully upgraded them; from that, nobody can deviate. But even so, the entrances to the rooms don’t need to be obvious. Take, for instance, Twitter user @AndrewBarnick’s clever use of the bookshelves, which are used to obscure a turnip vault that’s likely worth millions of bells.

Apparently, they’re not the only one with this idea!

The furniture above has to actively be moved to access the hidden room, but other players are positioning their book cases so they can wiggle behind it, despite appearing to be in the way.

These are straightforward ways to build a secret room in your house, but you aren’t relegated to just using book cases to disguise a door. One player, for instance, says they used a vending machine to hide their spooky interior:

Another player found that you can also used recolored panels for a similar effect, which is great for those of you who want to build horror houses.

Creepy rooms seem to be the most popular reason to have a secret entrance in the first place.

Really, any large piece of furniture is fair game for hiding a doorway, as evidenced by this climbing wall secret room:

But even if all you’ve got is a bookshelf, you can still get creative with it. Twitter user David Coates, for example, is pretending to hold a super hero room — crucial for hiding your secret identity.

Really, to pull off a secret room, it’s all about the atmosphere, and you can achieve that even when sticking to a book shelf.


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