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Ava, Rogue Warfare, and everything else you can now watch at home

Plus, Enola Holmes is a burst of joy on Netflix

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jessica chastain in ava Image: Vertical Entertainment

Given the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the release of Black Widow has been delayed yet again, shifting the Marvel release calendar, with Shang Chi now positioned as a precurssor to Eternals. However, that doesn’t mean that Marvel is putting a pause on production, as Samuel L. Jackson has just been announced to be reprising his role as Nick Fury for a new Disney Plus series.

On the DC side of the things, James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad, set to hit theaters next year, is already getting a spinoff. John Cena’s character, Peacemaker, will be getting his own series. In other development news, Sega is reportedly developing a live-action Yakuza movie focusing on Kazuma Kiryu.

For more movie, TV, and games news, keep an eye on this year’s New York Comic Con, where Polygon is acting as the official media partner. We’ve got a fun line-up of events planned, including panels and tabletop sessions. While you wait for NYCC, though, here are the movies you can watch at home this weekend.

Ava

Where to watch it: Rent on digital, $6.99 on Amazon, Google Play and Apple

jessica chastain in ava Photo: Vertical Entertainment

In this new action-thriller, Jessica Chastain stars as Ava, an assassin employed by a black ops organization and specializing in taking down high-profile targets. After a job goes wrong, she and her mentor Duke (John Malkovich) try to figure out what happened. However, unfortunate incidents keep on piling up, drawing Ava’s family into her orbit of violence. Colin Farrell co-stars as Simon, Duke’s boss, with Common as a figure from Ava’s past.

Misbehaviour

Where to watch it: Rent on digital, $3.99 on Google Play, $4.99 on Amazon and Apple

keira knightley and gugu mbatha-raw in misbehaviour Photo: 20th Century Fox

In 1970, the Miss World beauty competition was the most-watched TV program in the world. The women’s liberation movement, arguing that the show objectified women, disrupted the broadcast, taking over the stage. Keira Knightley and Jessie Buckley star as members of the women’s liberation movement, with Greg Kinnear as the competition’s host, Bob Hope, and Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Jennifer Hosten, competing as Miss Grenada.

Ottolenghi and the Cakes of Versailles

Where to watch it: Rent on digital, $5.99 on Amazon, $6,99 on Google Play and Apple

beautiful cakes on a table Photo: IFC Films

The documentary Ottolenghi and the Cakes of Versailles follows the chef Yotam Ottolenghi as he assembles a team of the world’s best pastry chefs — including Dominique Ansel and Dinara Kasko — in order to put on a Versailles-themed culinary gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. His mission to bring Versailles to life through cakes includes an edible garden and posh jello shots.

Rogue Warfare: Death of a Nation

Where to watch it: Rent on digital, $5.99 on Amazon, $6.99 on Google Play and Apple

a group of soldiers in rogue warfare: death of a nation Photo: Saban Films

The Rogue Warfare trilogy comes to a close with Death of a Nation, which sees both Stephen Lang and Will Yun Lee return as part of a team of soldiers who have been recruited from all over the world. This time, they have to stop a deadly bomb from going off, and only have 36 hours in which to do it.

New on Netflix this weekend

  • Stranger Things’ Millie Bobby Brown in Enola Holmes
  • The fourth season of Jack Whitehall: Travels with My Father
  • Season two of Jon Favreau’s The Chef Show
  • The new comedy series Sneakerheads

And here’s what dropped last Friday:

Antebellum

Where to watch it: Rent on digital, $19.99 on Amazon, Google Play and Apple

A bloodied Janelle Monáe looks wary in Antebellum Photo: Matt Kennedy/Lionsgate

Antebellum stars Janelle Monáe as a successful modern Black author who becomes caught up in a horrifying scheme that seems to bend the rules of time. It looks like horror or science fiction, but it’s something more tedious: a gory film about the horrors of American slavery. From our review:

In Antebellum, Bush and Renz desperately prod around in the dark, trying to discover the gravity of prestige slave movies like 12 Years a Slave. Slaves whistle “Lift Every Voice and Sing” in the cotton fields; one Confederate soldier calls another “snowflake”; grey-coats chant the Nazi refrain “blood and soil”; a statue of Robert E. Lee materializes on a foggy battlefield. The directors evoke these images as symbols, but don’t have the next-level horror-film ability to match symbolism with meaning. The narrative’s metaphorical thud resounds as loudly as the rolling sea.

No Escape

Where to watch it: Rent on digital, $6.99 on Amazon, Google Play and Apple

holland roden in no escape Photo: Vertical Entertainment

Keegan Allen stars as Cole, a social-media personality who travels to Moscow with his friends in a bid to generate even more content. But as the line between reality and content begins to blur, the trip takes a deadly turn. Teen Wolf’s Holland Roden co-stars as Cole’s girlfriend Erin.

Blackbird

Where to watch it: Rent on digital, $6.99 on Amazon and Apple

a gathered family Photo: Screen Media Films

Susan Sarandon stars in Blackbird as Lily, with Sam Neill as her husband Paul. Lily has been battling ALS, and has decided to end her life on her own terms. As a final farewell, she assembles her whole family for a last weekend together. The reunion becomes difficult as unresolved issues start to surface. Kate Winslet, Rainn Wilson, and Mia Wasikowska co-star.

All In: The Fight for Democracy

Where to watch it: Streaming on Amazon

stacey abrams in all in: the fight for democracy Photo: Amazon Studios

All In: The Fight for Democracy, directed by Liz Garbus (What Happened, Miss Simone?) and Lisa Cortés, focuses on the issue of voter suppression in anticipation of the upcoming election. Former Georgia House of Representatives Minority Leader Stacey Abrams serves as the documentary’s central figure, addressing both historical and current issues with laws about voting.