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Elektra Natchios leaps from a building in her Daredevil garb, with loose pants, a flowing tunic and scarf, a horned daredevil mask, and her signature billowing hair, in Daredevil #25, Marvel Comics (2020). Image: Chip Zdarsky, Marco Checchetto/Marvel Comics

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There’s a new female Daredevil in town

An oft-resurrected assassin starts a new life in Hell’s Kitchen

Last week, Daredevil went to jail. This week, there’s a new Daredevil on the streets of Hell’s Kitchen that you might recognize.

That’s right, it’s internationally feared assassin Elektra Natchios, a woman so scary her code name is just her first name. And look at that costume! Some incredible design work from Marco Checchetto.

What else is happening in the pages of our favorite comics? We’ll tell you. Welcome to Monday Funnies, Polygon’s weekly list of the books that our comics editor enjoyed this past week. It’s part society pages of superhero lives, part reading recommendations, part “look at this cool art.” There may be some spoilers. There may not be enough context. But there will be great comics. (And if you missed the last edition, read this.)


Daredevil #25

“The fist needs a queen and a king,” Stick tells Elektra, “And only one of them can survive,” in Daredevil #1, Marvel Comics (2020). Image: Chip Zdarsky, Marco Checchetto/Marvel Comics

Of course, Elektra has a bigger plan than just taking care of Hell’s Kitchen. She and Stick have found a way to destroy the Hand forever, but they need Matt’s help. But right now he’s honor bound to stay in jail and serve his sentence for manslaughter, and on top of that he still doesn’t trust Elektra or Stick.

But maybe if Elektra can gain his trust by taking care of Hell’s Kitchen, they can save the world together. At least that’s the plan.

King in Black #1

“I am going to kill your world,” says the symbiote god Knull, in King in Black #1, Marvel Comics (2020). Image: Donny Cates, Ryan Stegman/Marvel Comics (2020).

After two years of buildup, the biggest thing to ever happen in Venom comics is here: Marvel’s King in Black event, which you’ll be seeing impact books all around the publisher’s lineup, from the Avengers to the X-Men. Check out our review of the kickoff issue.

Justice League: Endless Winter #1

Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, the Flash, Green Lantern, and Superman stand at the edge of a massive dig site in the Arctic. “This is where my Fortress of Solitude was located before it was destroyed by Rogol Zaar,” Superman says, in Justice League: Endless Winter #1, DC Comics (2020). Image: Andy Lanning, Ron Marz, Howard Porter/DC Comics

Meanwhile, DC has their own mid-winter crossover hitting the shelves, Justice League: Endless Winter. That name might seem a little ominous, but the kickoff comic itself is some classic superhero adventure.

Also if you didn’t know that Superman moved the Fortress of Solitude to the Bermuda Triangle, well, now you do.

X-Factor #5

Members of X-Factor, including Eye-Boy, Daken, and Prodigy, notice Northstar and Aurora’s lightshow from their various locations in Krakoa’s Boneyard tower in X-Factor #5, Marvel Comics (2020). Image: Leah Williams, David Baldeón/Marvel Comics

X-Factor, the comic most concerned with how mutants die, had a lot of mopping up to do in the aftermath of X of Swords, but I particularly loved a motif of placing panels of various characters individual activities against wide shots of their massive tower home. That sounds simple, perhaps even clunky, but Leah Williams and David Baldeón use it to root all the characters in a single moment, apart but together. It just worked for me!

Black Widow #4

Black Widow destroys hechman after henchman across six vertical panels on a double page spread, swinging from a chandelier, leaping from a pool table, slamming a bar chair across a goon’s face with a WHAMMO, in Black Widow #4, Marvel Comics (2020). Image: Kelly Thompson, Elena Casagrande/Marvel Comics

Holy COW look at this fight scene from Elena Casagrande.

Fantastic Four Road Trip #1

Franklin Richards uses his reality warping powers to sort cosmic dust from desert sand, whipping up a beautifully rendered dust cloud as his family, the Fantastic Four, look on in awe, in Fantastic Four Road Trip #1, Marvel Comics (2020). Image: Christopher Cantwell, Filipe Andrade/Marvel Comics

There’s a lot of good art to pull from Fantastic Four: Road Trip, but most of it is either spoilery or just plain unintelligible out of context. So I’ll settle for this full page panel of Franklin Richards doing his thing, and just say that it’s a very solid one-shot story.