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Ms. Marvel, merged with a symbiote under the power of Knull, battles Miles Morales/Spider-Man in Miles Morales: Spider-Man #23, Marvel Comics (2021). Image: Saladin Ahmed, Carmen Carnero/Marvel Comics

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Ms. Marvel got her own gnarly Venom symbiote

Shapeshifter powers X shapeshifter powers = HORROR

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Everybody’s getting an evil mind-control symbiote in Marvel Comics these days, and this week, the dark symbiote Knull came for one of the brightest superheroes around: Ms. Marvel. In the pages of her best friend’s book, Miles Morales: Spider-Man, Kamala was overtaken by one of Knull’s symbiotes and absorbed into the hive mind.

What do you get when you combine a shapeshifter with a shapeshifter? Nightmare fuel.

What else is happening in the pages of our favorite comics? We’ll tell you. Welcome to Monday Funnies, Polygon’s weekly list of the books that our comics editor enjoyed this past week. It’s part society pages of superhero lives, part reading recommendations, part “look at this cool art.” There may be some spoilers. There may not be enough context. But there will be great comics. (And if you missed the last edition, read this.)


Miles Morales: Spider-Man #23

Miles Morales/Spider-Man is pinned down and the scooped up by a symbiote-merged Ms. Marvel’s twelve clawed hand in Miles Morales: Spider-Man #23, Marvel Comics (2021). Image: Saladin Ahmed, Carmen Carnero/Marvel Comics

The extra fun thing about this mashup is that Saladin Ahmed is the writer on both Miles’ book and Kamala’s book, so he’s doing his own little personal crossover here.

The extra extra fun thing is Symbiote/Kamala capturing Miles with this horrifying, giant, twelve-fingered hand here.

Superman: Worlds of War #2

“I won’t leave... until I’ve broken every chain on Warworld,” Superman tells Mongul. “On that day... when every slave is free, and every life you’ve taken is paid for... then I’ll go home.” He is chained and bound, in Superman: Worlds of War #2, DC Comics (2021). Image: Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Mikel Janín/DC Comics

Writer Phillip Kennedy Johnson will be taking over Superman and Action Comics in March, and I can honestly say that after reading his Future State Superman books, I’m very excited to see where this lyrical writer with a flair for epic events and asking for epic visuals goes with the two series.

Thor #12

Frog Thor slams his hammer, Frogjolnir, into the bloodied face of Donald Blake with a giant DOOM that takes up the entire page in Thor #12, Marvel Comics (2021). Image: Donny Cates, Nic Klein/Marvel Comics

Thor #12 was an entire issue about Frog Thor (a man who was turned into a frog, and has all the powers of Thor) fighting Donald Blake (Thor’s old alter ego who is a separate entity now, and has all the powers of Thor, and was driven mad and evil by isolation). Cates and Klein make the fight so good I almost couldn’t decide on a panel to include here.

I picked this one because of the big DOOM-shaped panel, a visual element of Thor stories all the way back to legendary Thor writer-artist Walter Simonson, himself the namesake for Frog Thor’s old human form, Simon Walterson. What a chef’s kiss.

Batman/Catwoman #3

Helena Wayne/Batwoman, talks with police commissioner Dick Grayson about the discovery of the Joker’s slain body in a Florida retirement community in Batman/Catwoman #3, DC Comics (2021). Her costume is a skin-tight grey suit, a black and yellow chest plate, and a black bat cowl that mimics the silhouette of the very first Batman design. Image: Tom King, Clay Mann/DC Comics

I might be off and on with Batman/Catwoman, but with issue #3, I’m back on to it, as the story’s present day turned to Helena Wayne/Batwoman, investigating the mysterious murder of the Joker. Readers already know it was her mother who did the deed.


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