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Good Omens gets official quarantine fanfiction for the book’s 30th anniversary

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Aziraphale and Crowley practice social distancing

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Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s hit fantasy novel Good Omens turns 30 today and to celebrate the book’s anniversary, a video imagines what the main characters would be doing under quarantine.

The three-minute video, shared on Pratchett’s YouTube channel and linked on Gaiman’s Twitter account, features a phone call between angel Aziraphale and demon Crowley, voiced by Michael Sheen and David Tennant who played the characters in the BBC miniseries. They ask one another how life is under lockdown. Aziraphale asks Crowley if he’s been up to any demon shenanigans, while also gushing about how much baking he’s gotten done. Though only the actor’s voices are featured in the video, it contains many little props and nods to the world, such as a map of Lower Tadfield and the books in Aziraphale’s shop.

The 1990 novel followed the angel and the demon who got a little too cozy on Earth as they work together to try and stop the impending apocalypse. A BBC miniseries, which in addition to Tennant and Sheen starred Adria Arjona and Jon Hamm, aired last summer.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to hold the world under lockdown, many fanfic writers are writing about quarantine in order to exhibit some sort of control in an ever-fluctuating world. Setting familiar stories with familiar characters in these uncertain times provides a source of comfort and entertainment. NBC’s new Parks and Recreation special employed a similar tactic, featuring the characters of the sitcom calling each other via video chat. Good Omens has long been a staple of internet fandom; officially contributing to a current trend in the fandom sphere only solidifies its stronghold.

The BBC adaptation of Good Omens is available to stream on Amazon Prime.


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